Author: Jason J. Redd

Significant Changes Coming To the Paycheck Protection Program

As of 6/3/20, over $100 billion in PPP funding was still available from SBA authorized participating lenders. Today, President Trump signed HR7010, the Paycheck Protection Program Flexibility Act of 2020. The bill changes specific loan forgiveness provisions of the Paycheck Protection Program (PPP). PPP was a part of the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act (“CARES Act”) passed by Congress to mitigate the effects of COVID-19. Companies or organizations who secured PPP loans are cautioned and advised to review the new legislation very carefully, as detailed below. Under PPP, eligible businesses could apply for forgivable loans of 2.5 times their average monthly payroll or $10 million, whichever is the lesser amount. A recipient can have 100 percent of its PPP loan forgiven if it uses the proceeds of the loan on the following items during the eight weeks beginning on the date of loan origination: Payroll costs as defined by the CARES Act; Any payment of interest on any covered mortgage obligation (which shall not include any prepayment of or payment of principal on a covered mortgage obligation); Any payment on any covered rent obligation; and Any covered utility payment. Loan recipients were also required to spend at least 75 percent of the loan proceeds on payroll costs. The new law contains the following...

UPDATE: Federal Reserve Board Expands Main Street Lending Program

After receiving extensive public comment during the past month, the Federal Reserve announced on April 30, 2020 that it will expand the scope and eligibility of its Main Street Lending Program (“Program”). The Federal Reserve’s recent action follows the unprecedented steps taken by the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve on April 9, 2020, to provide up to $2.3 trillion in credit facilities to households, employers, and state and local governments in response to the COVID-19 emergency’s impact on the U.S. economy. Gibbons previously covered these newly announced programs in a client alert. The Program facilitates lending to small and medium sized businesses. The Federal Reserve received 2,200 submissions relating to the Program, and on April 30, 2020 issued two updated Term Sheets and an initial Term Sheet, which are summarized as follows: The Program comprises the Main Street New Loan Facility (MSNLF), the Main Street Expanded Loan Facility (MSELF), and the new Main Street Priority Loan Facility (MSPLF). Below is a side-by-side comparison chart and additional details about the Program. Program Loan Options MSNLF MSPLF MSELF Term 4 years 4 years 4 years Minimum Loan Size $500,000 $500,000 $10,000,000 Maximum Loan Size Lesser of $25M or 4x 2019 adjusted EBITDA Lesser of $25M or 6x 2019 adjusted EBITDA Lesser of $200M, 35% of...

Third Phase of Federal Relief for Coronavirus: What Details We Know Right Now About the Legislation

While some companies have already begun to apply for relief from the Small Business Administration (SBA) and other government entities, others are waiting to see what additional programs may be on the horizon. While we do not know all the details of Phase III legislation in Congress, we do know it will include: Support for Businesses $10 billion for SBA emergency grants of up to $10,000 to provide immediate relief for small business operating costs $17 billion for SBA to cover six months of payments for small businesses with existing SBA loans A retention tax credit for employers to encourage businesses to keep workers on payroll during the crisis SBA loan forgiveness eligibility for rent, mortgage, and utility costs Support for State and Local Government $150 billion for a state, tribal, and local Coronavirus Relief Fund $30 billion for the Disaster Relief Fund to provide financial assistance to state, local, tribal, and territorial governments, as well as private nonprofits providing critical and essential services $10 billion for the Indian Health Services and other tribal programs Support for Industries $150 billion increase in the Marshall Plan for our healthcare system $30 billion in emergency education funding $25 billion in emergency transit funding Support for Workers Increase in the maximum unemployment benefit by $600 per week Four...

Financial Disaster Relief for Start-Ups – Yes, It Is Possible!

The specific challenge we are addressing here is for start-ups and other early-stage businesses. Gibbons attorneys are heavily involved in advising businesses in all industries and of all sizes on the full range of state and federal coronavirus disaster relief programs available to them. Start-ups and other early-stage companies face particular challenges in obtaining governmental relief. Gibbons understands this and is here to help. With our strong commitment to start-ups and other early-stage businesses, we recognize your dire need for funds for survival, as well as growth, at this critical period. We also recognize that the federal and state application requirements seem staggering. Founding teams are confronted with overwhelming requests for tax returns, current financial statements, monthly sales figures, and similar requirements. Which aid program(s) should you pursue? How do you decide? How does a pre-revenue or newly launched start-up demonstrate to federal and state agencies substantial economic injury? How do you determine the best route for disaster assistance with the highest chance of short-term success and without being overwhelmed by red tape? What is its most recent pre-coronavirus valuation, and how was it justified – for example, thought independent third party investments or a verified order pipeline? How much economic loss has now occurred due to the crisis? How do you complete the forms...

Budget Matters, Incentives, and Cannabis Will Be This Summer’s Hot Topics in Trenton

The Summer is here and the halls of the Legislature are quiet, but three topics that controlled much of the debate in Trenton this year are expected to drag into the Fall: the state budget, economic incentives, and cannabis. Fiscal Year 2020 Governor Murphy signed the Fiscal Year 2020 budget on June 30, avoiding a government shutdown, but not ending the debate on taxes and spending. After the Legislature sent the Governor a budget that did not include a millionaire’s tax, corporate responsibility fee, and tax on opioid manufacturers, the Governor line-item vetoed several appropriations and signed an Executive Order authorizing the State Treasury to place in reserve approximately $235 million in state appropriations. In 2016,Governor Christie took similar action when his Administration froze approximately $100 million in spending as the state health benefit plan design committees considered cost reductions. Prior to the July 4th holiday, the Murphy Administration announced the full list of spending items placed in reserve. The funds will only be released after the Treasurer certifies that certain revenue objectives are met, meaning this issue will linger for several months. Economic Incentives Also on June 30, the State’s two main economic incentive programs, the Grow NJ Assistance Program (GROWNJ) and the Economic and Redevelopment Growth Grant (ERGG) Program, expired and new applications...

Recap: IRS Convenes Public Hearing on Proposed Regulations for Opportunity Zones

Jason J. Redd, a Director in the Gibbons Government & Regulatory Affairs Department attended an overflowing public hearing on February 14 convened by the Internal Revenue Service for the purpose of obtaining input from stakeholders concerning the initial proposed regulations for Opportunity Zones (OZ) issued in October. The IRS is reviewing comments on the first round of proposed rules and is expected to issue the next round of proposed regulations in March, with the potential for final regulations to be issued in late spring. Witnesses at the packed hearing included state cabinet officials, as well as representatives from state economic development groups, small businesses, community reinvestment coalitions, investment funds, and technology and planning organizations, among others. Testimony focused on ensuring that program regulations maximize investment and economic growth by generating new development, capital, and jobs in the distressed communities where OZs are located. There was also a clear call, by all in attendance, for clarity and flexibility in the next round of rules. Suggestions included: (i) modifying the rules to provide more flexibility to investors when exiting Qualified Opportunity Fund (QOF) investments, which is currently limited to a sale of the QOF investment itself; (ii) minimizing sourcing and location rules for OZ business income; and (iii) allowing QOFs to reinvest interim gains within a reasonable...

Governor Christie Presents the FY 2018 Budget

Earlier this week, Governor Christie announced his final State Budget to a joint session of the Legislature. The Governor’s Fiscal Year 2018 budget of $35.5 billion represents a 2.6 percent increase from the prior year. It assumes annual growth in the State’s major tax revenues (gross income tax, sales tax, and corporate business tax) and also reallocates funding between programs. The highlights of the FY 2018 Budget include: $17.4 billion in school and local aid, representing almost half of all State spending; A $2.5 billion contribution to the State pension system, with payments occurring quarterly; Cuts to most Executive Departments including Agriculture, Community Affairs, Corrections, Environmental Protection, Labor, Law and Public Safety, Military and Veterans Affairs, Transportation, and Treasury; Funding increases to the Departments of Health and Human Services for the expansion of FamilyCare, opioid addiction treatment, and graduate medical education; $20 million appropriation for lead remediation assistance for low and moderate income households; Additional State health benefit reforms, saving the State $125 million in FY 2018; and A lump-sum contribution from the State Lottery system to the State’s pension system to reduce the existing unfunded liability. Governor Christie also proposed a supplemental appropriation in the current fiscal year of $400 million for the State’s transportation system, to be allocated within the next 100 days....

New Jersey Legislature Focuses on Drone Technology

The First Legislative District Economic Development Task Force (“Task Force”) will meet on February 23, 2017, to discuss unmanned aviation technology and the potential impact it could have on the Southern New Jersey region. The Task Force, established by the New Jersey Senate in 2014 and reauthorized in 2016, was charged with “identifying methods, policies, regulations, incentives, and tools to foster economic activity and create jobs in Atlantic, Cape May, and Cumberland counties.” To accomplish its work, the 11-member Task Force is composed of a broad cross-section of thought leaders from the political, educational, and economic spheres. Over the last three years, the Task Force has met multiple times and has studied several issues of importance to the region. It has also studied aquaculture development and educational initiatives to develop a more skillful workforce. Throughout their deliberations, the members of the Task Force have identified actions that will grow the workforce and position the region to attract and support innovation. As the home of the William J. Hughes Technical Center and Stockton University, Southern New Jersey is known for aviation innovation. The testimony received by the Task Force on February 23rd will highlight the potential assets of the region. This potential paired with New Jersey-based economic incentives could position New Jersey to serve as a...

New Jersey’s Legislature Attempts to Override Governor’s Objections to “Equal Pay” Bill

The sponsors of pay equity legislation passed by the New Jersey Senate and Assembly earlier this year have announced that the State Senate will attempt to override Governor Christie’s veto of the bill on December 19, 2016. Senate Bill 992/Assembly Bill 2750 would amend the Law Against Discrimination (“LAD”) to promote gender pay equality. The New Jersey bill follows a trend of recently enacted state laws, in California, New York, Maryland, and Massachusetts, that aim to make it easier for plaintiffs to bring pay equity claims and subject employers to potentially greater damages.

Sufferers of PTSD Gain Access to Medicinal Marijuana

On September 14, 2016, New Jersey amended its medicinal marijuana law to add post-traumatic stress disorder (‘PTSD’) as a qualifying condition, permitting PTSD sufferers to gain access to this unconventional therapy for the first time. Some background — In 2009, New Jersey became the 14th state to allow access to medicinal marijuana. Over the past seven years, 11 additional states have expanded their laws to allow access to medical marijuana. In New Jersey, the original law provided access to medical marijuana for the following conditions: Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis; Multiple sclerosis; Terminal cancer; Muscular dystrophy; Inflammatory bowel disease, including Crohn’s disease; Terminal illness, if the physician has determined a prognosis of less than 12 months of life; Seizure disorder, including epilepsy; Intractable skeletal muscular spasticity; Glaucoma; Positive status for human immunodeficiency virus; Acquired immune deficiency syndrome; and Cancer. Under the amended law signed by Governor Christie, a patient with PTSD would be eligible for medicinal marijuana if she has been unsuccessful alleviating her symptoms with conventional medical therapy. Additionally, the patient would have to obtain certification of her condition from a physician with whom she has a “bona fide physician-patient relationship.” Several other recent developments on this issue merit a brief review. In August 2016, the Department of Health (“DOH”) asked for public input on additional...